Games make up a significant part of our homeschool curricula. I try to find board games for every subject, including literature. There are more literature based games than you would think, though many of them require the skill levels of someone who is well read. While homeschooling the cohorts, I often use games to reinforce knowledge or skills instead of using tests, especially with younger ages. The more unschooly Underling uses games of all sorts to learn anything and everything.

Literature based games range from games about specific titles to games about literature in general. Below is a quick list of literary board and card games (known also as table top games). This is by no means an exhaustive list, but has a small variety of games for each age level (or skill set). This post contains affiliate links and ads to help support future board game purchases for our homeschooling adventure. You can find my disclosure policy here.

Let’s Feed the Very Hungry Caterpillar game is for ages 3 and up and corresponds with Eric Carle’s book, The Very Hungary Caterpillar.

Madeline Card Game is for ages 3 and up. With these cards you can play three different card games: Go Fish, Snap, and Memory. These cards are based on the Madeline books by Ludwig Bemelmans.

The Eloise Game is for ages 8 and up and is, you guessed it, based on Kay Thompson’s Eloise books. This game can be harder to find and is usually expensive, but if you find it used or at a garage sale, snap it up.

The next two games aren’t based on fiction, but on a great US geography book, The Scrambled States of America, by Laurie Keller. Unrestrained HomeschoolingScrambled States 2 Card Game is for ages ages 6 and up. Scrambled States Game is for ages 8 and up, but with some minor adaptions it can be played with younger kids.

Bookopoly is Monopoly but with books. So instead of St. James Place, it is a book title, like Black Beauty. It is designed for ages 8 and up.

Munchkin Grimm Tidings makes references to several different Grimm’s Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm. It is designed for ages 10 and up. Since we are huge Munchkin game and fairy take fans, this must be on any literary game list. This is the game pictured at the top of this post.

The Play’s the Thing Board Game is a Shakespeare game for ages 8 and up. This game has several levels of play so kids of all Shakespeare knowledge levels can play (from beginner to expert).

Another fun Shakespeare game is available through Simply Fun. It is called Do You Know Shakespeare and is for ages 12 and up. This one does require a little more exposure to Shakespeare in order to play (and win).

A Christmas Carol Board Game is based on the book with the same name by Charles Dickens. This book can be play by children as young as 8, however, to enjoy playing the game, they must have a working knowledge of the book. Because of this, I recommend it for whatever year they read The Christmas Carol.

The last game on this list is It Was A Dark and Stormy Night recommended for ages 14 and up. This game is difficult to find, but is worth the trouble to hunt down. It is a game of first lines from books of different genres. This is a good game to play in teams with each team made up of people with varying ages. Naturally, the more well read you are, the better you will do.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This